Related digital learning objects

These Digital Learning Objects from the National Digital Learning resources network (Education Services Australia, ESA) can be used to introduce aspects of multimodal design and composition to support multimodal design and authoring.
Access to these resources for Australian teachers is through your education system’s online portal; or otherwise through direct online log-in to Scootle. This content is restricted to teachers and students in Australian schools and other bodies licensed by The Le@rning Federation. For more details and contact information, go to the Access information page.

Lights, camera, action: camera TLF-ID L2844

Explore how cameras are used to tell a story in films. Learn words used to describe camera shots, movements and angles. See how combinations of camera shots can hide or reveal things, set a mood and influence audience feelings. Look at ways to create feelings such as excitement, humour or fear. For example, filming from above makes a subject look small or scared. Look at a model sequence of shots in a romance film. Notice how different views change the meaning of a scene. Choose camera effects for a comedy or horror film. Move the focus of the camera to build a scary feeling or set up a joke. This learning object is one in a series of four objects.

Lights, camera, action: editing TLF-ID L2845

Explore how editing helps to tell a story in films. Learn words used to describe transitions and time span of scenes. See how the order of scenes and type of transitions can affect the flow, set a mood and keep an audience interested. Look at ways to create feelings such as excitement, humour or fear. For example, a ‘fade-in’ transition introduces a subject gently and may create a romantic mood. Look at a model sequence of shots in a romance film. Notice how different editing choices change the meaning of a scene. Choose sequences for a comedy or horror film. Choose shots to build a scary feeling or set up a joke. This learning object is one in a series of four objects.

Lights, camera, action: lighting TLF-ID L2846

Explore how lighting effects are used in films to tell a story. Learn words used to describe light levels and lighting effects. See how combinations of lighting can hide or reveal things, set a mood and influence audience feelings. Look at ways to create feelings such as excitement, humour or fear. For example, dim lighting makes a subject look softer and more romantic. Look at a model sequence of shots in a romance film. Notice how different views change the meaning of a scene. Choose lighting effects for a comedy or horror film. Vary the lighting levels and use effects to build a scary feeling or set up a joke. This learning object is one in a series of four objects.

Lights, camera, action: sound TLF-L2847

Explore how sounds are used in films to tell a story. Learn words used to describe sound effects and variations. Listen to how combinations of sounds can hide or reveal things, make a scene more realistic, set a mood and influence audience feelings. Look at ways to create feelings such as excitement, sadness or fear. For example, fast music suggests action and excitement. Look at a model sequence of sounds in a romance film. Notice how different sounds change the meaning of a scene. Choose sound effects for a comedy or horror film. Add music and other sounds to build a scary feeling or set up a joke. This learning object is one in a series of four objects.

Character maker: creating a sceneTLF-ID  L2854

Build a scene to advertise a new cartoon show. Choose characters and scene elements that will attract a particular target audience such as ‘fashion kids’. Combine elements such as a main character, sidekick, background, music and sound effects. Make all of the elements work together to give a clear message to the target audience. This learning object is one in a series of four objects.

Character maker: visual attributes TLF-ID L2851

Build animated characters for a new cartoon show. Choose visual attributes to communicate information about your cartoon character’s personality to the audience. Choose shapes and items to suit a character’s personality. Combine elements such as body shape, head size, clothing and accessories. For example, choose a relatively large, round head to suit a friendly character. Make all of the elements work together to give a clear message to the audience. This learning object is one in a series of four objects.

Character maker: movement TLF-ID L2852

Build animated characters for a new cartoon show. Choose each character’s walking movements to suit their personality, mood, actions and relationship to other characters. For example, show a character is sad by choosing a slow walk with feet dragging along the ground. Combine elements such as speed, posture and bounciness. Make all of the elements work together to give a clear message to the audience. This learning object is one in a series of four objects.

Character maker: sound TLF-ID L2853

Build animated characters for a new cartoon show. Choose sound elements to communicate information about your character’s personality, feelings and particular situation to the audience. Choose each character’s voice to show their personality. Choose music to help show how a character is feeling in a range of situations. Choose sound effects to give extra information to the audience about different situations. Combine sound elements to create the complete character. Make all of the elements work together to give a clear message to the audience. This learning object is one in a series of four objects.

Web designer: dragons: level 1 TLF-ID L3270

Browse jumbled web pages, which are all connected with dragons. Match material to the type of website it belongs to: cultural, natural science or Chinese restaurant. Identify features of the texts. For example, identify opinion adjectives such as ‘tasty’ that describe restaurant food in a positive way. Match up the title, main body text, graphics and animation. Choose words and images suited to the topic or content. This learning object is one in a series of four objects.

Web designer: dragons: level 2 TLF-ID L3269

Browse jumbled web pages, which are all connected with dragons. Match material to the type of website it belongs to: cultural, natural science or Chinese restaurant. Identify features of the texts. For example, identify adverbs such as ‘friendly’ that refer to personal interactions. Match up the title, main body text, graphics and animation. Choose words and images suited to the topic or content. This learning object is one in a series of four objects.

Web designer: Viking Britain: level 1 TLF-ID L3268

Browse jumbled web pages, which are all connected with Vikings. Match material to the type of website it belongs to: history, tourism or sci-fi movie. Identify features of the texts. For example, identify past tense verbs such as ‘came’, ‘became’ and ‘settled’. Match up the title, main body text, graphics and animation. Choose words and images suited to the topic or content. This learning object is one in a series of four objects.

Web designer: Viking Britain: level 2TLF-ID L3267

Browse jumbled web pages, which are all connected with Vikings. Match material to the type of website it belongs to: history, tourism or sci-fi movie. Identify features of the texts. For example, identify words suggesting a warlike attitude such as ‘invaded’, ‘plundering’ and pirate raid’. Match up the title, main body text, graphics and animation. Choose words and images suited to the topic or content. This learning object is one in a series of four objects.

Gamemaker: level 1 TLF-ID L3271

Find out how video gamemakers change the look and feel of a game through combinations of sound, image, words and movement. Change a mobile phone game to suit a different audience such as Sporty gamers. Choose elements such as background, title, music and play speed. Check a market research summary of what the audience likes. Make all of the elements work together to appeal to the audience. This learning object is the first in a series of two objects that progressively increase in difficulty.

Gamemaker: level 2 TLF-ID L3272

Find out how video gamemakers change the look and feel of a game through combinations of sound, image, words and movement. Change a mobile phone game to suit a different audience such as Space gamers. Choose elements such as sound effect, images, title and play speed. Check a market research summary of what the audience likes. Make all of the elements work together to appeal to the audience. This learning object is the second in a series of two objects that progressively increase in difficulty.

My design: talking cat: create own text TLF-ID L8183

Design a talking cat to present at show and tell. Create your cat by selecting from a range of elements such as mood, size and colour. Choose a voice and background picture for your cat. Decide on a name that suits your talking cat. Add a note about your cat. Watch the animation. You can change your design as many times as you like. Evaluate the impact of your design by using icons and adding your opinion. This learning object is one in a series of six objects.

My design: talking cat: choose text TLF-ID L8184

Design a talking cat to present at show and tell. Create your cat by selecting from a range of elements such as mood, size and colour. Choose a voice and background picture for your cat. Decide on a name that suits your talking cat. Select a note about your cat. Watch the animation. Change your design as many times as you like. Evaluate the impact of your design by using icons and selecting a comment. This learning object is one in a series of six objects.

My design: talking dinosaur: choose text TLF-ID L8185

Design a talking dinosaur to present at show and tell. Create your dinosaur by selecting from a range of elements such as mood, size and colour. Choose a voice and background picture for your dinosaur. Decide on a name that suits your talking dinosaur. Select a note about your dinosaur. Watch the animation. You can change your design as many times as you like. Evaluate the impact of your design by using icons and selecting a comment. This learning object is one in a series of six objects.

My design: talking dinosaur: create own text TLF-ID L8186

Design a talking dinosaur to present at show and tell. Create your dinosaur by selecting from a range of elements such as mood, size and colour. Choose a voice and background picture for your dinosaur. Decide on a name that suits your talking dinosaur. Add a note about your dinosaur. Watch the animation. You can change your design as many times as you like. Evaluate the impact of your design by using icons and adding your opinion. This learning object is one in a series of six objects.

My design: talking car: choose text TLF-ID L8187

Design a talking car to present at show and tell. Create your car by selecting from a range of elements such as mood, size and colour. Choose a voice and background picture for your car. Decide on a name that suits your talking car. Select a note about your car. Watch the animation. You can change your design as many times as you like. Evaluate the impact of your design by using icons and selecting a comment. This learning object is one in a series of six objects.

My design: talking car: create own text TLF-ID L8188

Design a talking car to present at show and tell. Create your car by selecting from a range of elements such as mood, size and colour. Choose a voice and background picture for your car. Decide on a name that suits your talking car. Add a note about your car. Watch the animation. You can change your design as many times as you like. Evaluate the impact of your design by using icons and adding your opinion. This learning object is one in a series of six objects.

Picture story: outdoor adventure TLF-ID L8199

View a movie created from a still photo of people horseriding. See how combinations of camera shots can hide things from, or reveal things to, the audience and create mood. Use software tools to remake this same movie from the original photo. Select the three elements from the photo which become the movie shots. Sequence these shots in the right order on the storyboard. Add moves between each shot. Tell a different story using the same photo. Select three elements of the photo as shots, sequence them and add movement. Write a story idea for a different photo. Then create your own movie using the tools. This learning object is one in a series of four objects.

Picture story: situations TLF-ID L8200

View a movie created from a still photo of people inside a room with others outside the window. See how combinations of camera shots can hide things from, or reveal things to, the audience and create mood. Use software tools to remake this same movie from the original photo. Select the three elements from the photo which become the movie shots. Sequence these shots in the right order on the storyboard. Add moves between each shot. Tell a different story using the same photo. Select three elements of the photo as shots, sequence them and add movement. Write a story idea for a different photo. Then create your own movie using the tools. This learning object is one in a series of four objects.

Picture story: in the crowd TLF-ID L8201

View a movie created from a still photo of people on a crowded street. See how combinations of camera shots can hide things from, or reveal things to, the audience and create mood. Use software tools to remake this same movie from the original photo. Select the three elements from the photo which become the movie shots. Sequence these shots in the right order on the storyboard. Add moves between each shot. Tell a different story using the same photo. Select three elements of the photo as shots, sequence them and add movement. Write a story idea for a different photo. Then create your own movie using the tools. This learning object is one in a series of four objects.

Picture story: history TLF-ID L8202

View a movie created from a still historical photo of people building the Sydney Harbour bridge. See how combinations of camera shots can hide things from, or reveal things to, the audience and create mood. Use software tools to remake this same movie from the original photo. Select the three elements from the photo which become the movie shots. Sequence these shots in the right order on the storyboard. Add moves between each shot. Tell a different story using the same photo. Select three elements of the photo as shots, sequence them and add movement. Write a story idea for a different photo. Then create your own movie using the tools. This learning object is one in a series of four objects.

Design a layout: advertisement TLF-ID L8744

Examine how visual elements in a print advertisement affect reader response. Compare a poorly created print advertising layout with a good layout and identify how the visual elements in the good layout work better to convey meaning to the reader. Explore how the style, size, colour and placement of images, text and other page elements can improve the readability of the page. Examine the print advertisement’s model layouts, then create a new layout to suit the advertisment’s requirements. Try different layouts to compare the effect. Finally, reflect on what a good layout for an advertisment is and why it is important. This learning object is one in a series of four objects.

Design a layout: movie poster TLF-ID L8745

Examine how visual elements in a movie poster affect reader response. Compare a poorly created poster layout with a good layout and identify how the visual elements in the good layout work better to convey meaning to the reader. Explore how the style, size, colour and placement of images, text and other page elements can improve the readability of the poster. Examine the poster’s model page layouts, then create a new layout to suit the requirements. Try different page layouts to compare the effect. Finally, reflect on what a good layout for a movie poster is and why it is important. This learning object is one in a series of four objects.

Design a layout: local newspaper TLF-ID L8746

Examine how visual elements in a newspaper page affect reader response. Compare a poorly created newspaper page layout with a good page layout and identify how the visual elements in the good layout work better to convey meaning to the reader. Explore how the style, size, colour and placement of images, text and other page elements can improve the readability of the page. Examine the newspaper’s model page layouts, and then create a new page layout to suit the newspaper’s requirements. Try different page layouts to compare the effect. Finally, reflect on what a good layout for a newspaper is and why it is important. This learning object is one in a series of four objects.